What Is INSGC?

Indiana Space Grant Consortium is one of the 52 Consortia part of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. In the state of Indiana, INSGC is a source of NASA-related information, awards and programs.

The consortium works to carry out education, research, and public outreach activities in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) related to space, aeronautics, aviation, and Earth system science, all while advocating increased financial and government support for Space Grant Consortia.

Consisting of 26 different affiliates including colleges, universities, businesses, and other private and public sector institutions, INSGC promotes aerospace education and career training by

    1. Supporting STEM students through various scholarship, internship and fellowship opportunities
    2. Assisting faculty and students in their development of skills in STEM related fields
    3. Offering experiential training aligned with NASA Strategic Enterprises, and
    4. Inspiring public interest in aerospace-related disciplines and lifelong learning through partnerships with educators at all levels...

OSTEM Highlights 2020

Here's why the Space Grant is important!

GRANT TO FUND TRINE RESEARCH INTO SPACEWALK IMPACTS ON ASTRONAUTS

September 21st, 2021

A $15,000 grant from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC) will fund an undergraduate research project at Trine University that seeks to help understand the impact of spacewalks on astronauts.

Trine University biomedical engineering seniors Madison Howard of Pleasant Lake, Michigan, and Ashley Spirrison of Fishers, Indiana, will lead the project, titled “Developing Microfluidic Technology to Model the Vascular Health of Astronauts.” Max Gong, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Bock Department of Biomedical Engineering, will serve as advisor.

The project seeks to help address concerns NASA has regarding the safety of its astronauts while completing missions outside of Earth’s atmosphere, Gong said.

During missions, astronauts execute Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), commonly referred to as spacewalks, to repair and complete quality checks of spacecraft, and for research and exploration purposes. Prior to an EVA, astronauts must be exposed to 100% hyperoxia (a state of excess supply of oxygen in tissues and organs) for approximately five to eight hours, with repeats of the protocol two to three times each week.

This increase in blood oxygenation has been linked to DNA damage to lung tissue, overproduction of nitric oxide, cell damage from lipid peroxidation, and increased pulmonary fibrosis, Gong said.

Hyperoxia also causes blood vessels to narrow and abnormalities in the architecture of organs, limiting blood flow or fluid transfer through organs.

The Trine students will develop microfluidic vasculature-on-a-chip models, engineered models that mimic living tissues, of blood and lymphatic vessels to investigate the relationship between hyperoxia and its negative health effects. Such models have been used to better understand vascular health in diseases, such as atherosclerosis, Gong said, and can be applied to studying and improving the health of astronauts.

The Indiana Space Grant Consortium was created in 1991 under NASA’s National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Space Grant national network includes organizations working to expand opportunities for Americans to learn about and participate in NASA’s aeronautics and space projects by supporting and enhancing science and engineering education, research and public outreach efforts.

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ANNOUNCEMENT!

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Our Trine University student team took 2nd place overall in the NASA HERC competition this year, with the awards ceremony held virtually today.

This is a best finish for the team going back to 2010 and the 3rd year in a row that the Trine team earned an award.

Congratulations Trine University!

Purdue Aerial Robotics Team Annual Report 2021 - 2022

Team Purpose:

Mature students into principled industry leaders for their post-undergraduate careers by executing a comprehensive industry standard approach to interdisciplinary design, prototyping, and systems engineering.

Pathways Internship Employment Program (IEP) Opportunity at NASA

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ROCK ON 2022!

The Next How-To Workshop

  • Held Virtually But Still Super Awesome!
  • 15th annual "Rock On" event

Registration for RockOn 2022 is now open.  Thank you for your patience while we figured everything out.  Unfortunately, the workshop will be virtual again but done the same way as last year, which according to the surveys, was very well received by the participants.  There is a chance that this year teams may have the opportunity come to watch the launch.  I will not know for sure until late April or May.

I did change how registration is done this year based on feedback from last year.  When you register this year, you are registering a team not an individual.  You may have one individual or 3 or more on a team.  It is totally up to you but each team will be sent one kit.  I hope to have 60 kits available for this year’s RockOn but it could be less due to labor and part shortages.  We hope to fly 32 to 40 kits on the Sounding Rocket flight in June and 20 to 28 on the HASP flight in September.

If you believe you already have reserved a spot with myself or someone else on my team via email, phone call, text, USPS letter, or mystic thoughts, you must register to officially secure your team(s) spot(s).

https://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-home

The application is now open! For more information view the link below.

 

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS!

The FAA-sponsored Airport Cooperative Research Program’s University Design Competition for Addressing Airport Needs provides an outstanding opportunity for individual students or student teams working under the guidance of faculty advisors to design solutions to real world issues addressing our nation’s airports and the National Air System.

Students win cash prizes ($3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second and $1,000 for third place) in each of four different broad categories:

      • Airport Operations and Maintenance
      • Airport Management
      • Environmental Interactions of Airports
      • Runway Safety/Runway Excursions/Runway Incursions Including Aprons, Ramps, and Taxiway

Airport needs embrace many disciplines including all engineering fields, environmental science, business, data science, computer science, psychology, and many others.

A variety of multidisciplinary topics are suggested, but students can come up with their own relevant topics for their design solution.  The competition is an excellent open-ended design project for capstone courses and is also frequently used in other courses, for independent study, or as a professional society student chapter project.

First place winners present their work at an award ceremony at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine in Washington,D.C. and also at a relevant national professional conference.  All expenses are covered.

Interaction with airport operators and industry experts is required.  The Competition provides access to experts and to airport operators through its program website.

The Competition runs from August 16, 2021 to May 13, 2022.  Students can work in either or both academic semesters.  Additional information regarding the ACRP University Design Competition can be found at the Competition web site located at www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPDesignCompetition.aspx.

The updated guidelines for submission are attached and can be found at https://vsgc.odu.edu/acrpdesigncompetition/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/08/2021

-2022-ACRPDesignGuidelines-8-4.pdf.

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is part of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies.  The Virginia Space Grant Consortium manages the Competition on behalf of the ACRP.

We hope you will consider this opportunity which has provided 2,625 students and 166 faculty advisors from 88 institutions with an outstanding education opportunity immersed in real-world needs and that you will share it with other faculty or students who might have an interest.

Airports are busier, airliners are filling up, and everything associated with air travel is showing signs of recovery after a difficult year. It’s a great time to get out and spread your wings again – even more so with National Aviation Day (Thursday, August 19th)  just around the corner. ‘Spread Your Wings’ is the theme for NASA’s #NationalAviationDay digital campaign this year. We are reaching out to you in hopes that your organization will want to join the online fun and we can all share the same/similar theme around the celebration. The NASA account leading efforts for the day will be the @NASAAero account on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter. The day will be filled with aeronautics content and encouragement for our audience to join in on the occasion as well. Our feature in preparation for National Aviation Day is now live: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/spread-your-wings-on-national-aviation-day and should you decide to make social media plans or have any questions, please feel to contact our social lead Jessica.Arreola@nasa.gov.

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NASA space grant funds research projects

Valparaiso University was awarded over $100,000 from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC), a not-for-profit organization consisting of 23 schools and corporate affiliates. This money will fund five research projects for faculty and students over the summer. Since Valpo joined the INSGC in 1996, faculty have applied for grants to conduct research. They apply by submitting proposals relating to NASA’s basic objectives.

“[The proposals] all have to relate in some way to one of NASA's core objectives. So, if you look at the titles of the grants, they may relate to things like the growth of organisms in space or something having to do with that,” said Assistant Director of Student Research Stan Zygmunt.

NASA gave out the grants to develop and train the next generation of scientists in several disciplines.

“And so these are people that NASA wants to support, so that they can build up national infrastructure for American science,” Zygmunt said.

The projects funded through these grants are part of Valpo’s Summer Undergraduate Research Program, a summer internship for students. As the INSGC is a subsidiary of NASA, the program is primarily for students in STEM majors. The internship is paid and provides free summer housing.

More importantly, it gives undergraduate students an opportunity to devote time to research something in which they’re interested.

“Having these experiences for a student, I think is very important, not only for students who want to go on and get a Masters or PhD, but for any student who's interested in learning more deeply about a subject and understanding how research works. Or you just get to know the area in a much deeper level than you would during the year in classes,” Provost Eric Johnson said.

Fourteen undergraduate Valpo students completed the internship this year in subjects such as biology, chemistry, engineering, astronomy and physics. Two students from Ivy Tech Community College in Valparaiso, IN were also accepted to join.

The projects covered a range of topics, with Zygmunt explaining that all of the research revolved around resolving practical issues in space travel. One included creating compounds to combat superbugs on the International Space Station.

“The application of that connection with space was ‘Hey you might be up in the space station for long periods of time and what sorts of odd organisms and bugs might we get up there’. Somebody gets sick, you can't bring your doctor up there all of a sudden to treat it, so you've got to develop resources that could be helpful in those environments,” Zygmunt said.

 For astronomy students, the grants provide half the amount of funding for the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy, through which Professor of Physics and Astronomy Todd Hillwig is able to lead students in operating three off-site telescopes, which are shared between multiple universities.

“There’s a telescope in Arizona, there's a telescope in Chile, and another one in the Canary Islands, that Professor Hillwig in our department is able to use to do observations for his research and there's an annual fee for that. The Space Grant gives us partial support to pay that fee,” Zygmunt said.

In addition, researchers attended weekly workshops on various STEM topics. These included “Diversity & Inclusion,” “Oral Presentations,” “Ethics in Research” and “Abstracts & Posters.”

All of the work conducted throughout the internship culminated with the Summer Interdisciplinary Research Symposium on July 23. The symposium allowed students to present their research to a larger audience and also featured guest speaker Dr. Karin Calvinho of startup company RenewCO2.

“The whole purpose is to highlight, to showcase all that you've done over the summer. It gives the students a great opportunity to talk with other faculty, with the administrators about what they did,” Johnson said.

Zygmunt is hoping the internship will be open to a broader range of studies in future years than just STEM disciplines.

“And so, we're always interested and excited about faculty members in other parts of [the] university who want to do research with students in the summers. It's just part of the culture in science and engineering, but [we’re] hoping to see that expand to other areas,” Zygmunt said.

For those interested, the student researchers will be presenting their work at a Fall Symposium. It will take place Oct. 8 at 3 p.m. in the Center for the Sciences.

INSGC Photo Of The Day

May 16th, 2022

Explanation: Real castles aren't this old. And the background galaxy is even older. Looking a bit like an alien castle, the pictured rock spires are called hoodoos and are likely millions of years old. Rare, but found around the world, hoodoos form when dense rocks slow the erosion of softer rock underneath. The pictured hoodoos survive in the French Alps and are named Demoiselles Coiffées -- which translates to English as "Ladies with Hairdos". The background galaxy is part of the central disk of our own Milky Way galaxy and contains stars that are typically billions of years old. The photogenic Cygnus sky region -- rich in dusty dark clouds and red glowing nebulas -- appears just above and behind the hoodoos. The featured image was taken in two stages: the foreground was captured during the evening blue hour, while the background was acquired from the same location later that night.

May 16th

Funding

Funding source for INSGC Fellowships, Internships; Research and Outreach Project funding for Higher Education, K-12, and Informal Education through INSGC affiliates.

Academic

Research funding available for undergraduates, graduates and faculty.

Industry

Collaboration opportunities with industries for internships and skill set training.

Outreach

Funding for projects that create public awareness of INSGC and NASA.

Need Funding?

Browse through the opportunities we offer and apply today!

K-12

Indiana Space Grant Consortium supports K-12 education by offering space based resources to excite children about STEM and NASA education. You can find these resources below.

Educational Resources

Teacher Resources

Educational Programs

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Higher Education

INSGC higher education affiliates throughout Indiana with eligible students, must be a US citizen, enrolled full-time as a collegiate student, be involved in STEM related research or STEM education project, are eligible to apply for scholarship/fellowship.

Undergraduate

Beginning in 2020, INSGC no longer offers UG Scholarships. Instead INSGC offers Undergraduate Research Internships.

Students will not directly apply for this funding from INSGC. Faculty members (PI) who are supervising a research activity will apply for the award for the number of students planning to participate in the project. UG students will be paid an hourly rate for research.

 

Graduate

Fellowships, Masters/Ph.D are available for graduate students pursuing research projects with any INSGC affiliate. New for 2020, applicants must specify a NASA Center and/or a Mission Directorate alignment.

Faculty

Research awarded to be conducted by faculty who submit project proposals that help NASA achieve national research objectives

New for 2020. All proposals must specify a NASA Center and/or Mission Directorate with which it is aligned.

Informal Education

Information, resources, and funding for Professional Development for informal educators relating to science, technology, engineering, and math.

Outreach

INSGC outreach affiliates may apply for grant funding that engages K-12 students in STEM curriculum and hands-on learning.

New for 2020. All proposals must specify a NASA Center and/or Mission Directorate with which it is aligned.

View our Academic pages for more information.

Looking For Career Opportunities?

INSGC currently has a career page with information 

and a few valuable resources!

The INSGC twitter page is linked above. There will also be a link to our INSGC Facebook page shortly.

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