What Is INSGC?

Indiana Space Grant Consortium is one of the 52 Consortia part of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. In the state of Indiana, INSGC is a source of NASA-related information, awards and programs.

The consortium works to carry out education, research, and public outreach activities in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) related to space, aeronautics, aviation, and Earth system science, all while advocating increased financial and government support for Space Grant Consortia.

Consisting of 26 different affiliates including colleges, universities, businesses, and other private and public sector institutions, INSGC promotes aerospace education and career training by

    1. Supporting STEM students through various scholarship, internship and fellowship opportunities
    2. Assisting faculty and students in their development of skills in STEM related fields
    3. Offering experiential training aligned with NASA Strategic Enterprises, and
    4. Inspiring public interest in aerospace-related disciplines and lifelong learning through partnerships with educators at all levels...

OSTEM Highlights 2020

Here's why the Space Grant is important!

GRANT TO FUND TRINE RESEARCH INTO SPACEWALK IMPACTS ON ASTRONAUTS

September 21st, 2021

A $15,000 grant from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC) will fund an undergraduate research project at Trine University that seeks to help understand the impact of spacewalks on astronauts.

Trine University biomedical engineering seniors Madison Howard of Pleasant Lake, Michigan, and Ashley Spirrison of Fishers, Indiana, will lead the project, titled “Developing Microfluidic Technology to Model the Vascular Health of Astronauts.” Max Gong, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Bock Department of Biomedical Engineering, will serve as advisor.

The project seeks to help address concerns NASA has regarding the safety of its astronauts while completing missions outside of Earth’s atmosphere, Gong said.

During missions, astronauts execute Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), commonly referred to as spacewalks, to repair and complete quality checks of spacecraft, and for research and exploration purposes. Prior to an EVA, astronauts must be exposed to 100% hyperoxia (a state of excess supply of oxygen in tissues and organs) for approximately five to eight hours, with repeats of the protocol two to three times each week.

This increase in blood oxygenation has been linked to DNA damage to lung tissue, overproduction of nitric oxide, cell damage from lipid peroxidation, and increased pulmonary fibrosis, Gong said.

Hyperoxia also causes blood vessels to narrow and abnormalities in the architecture of organs, limiting blood flow or fluid transfer through organs.

The Trine students will develop microfluidic vasculature-on-a-chip models, engineered models that mimic living tissues, of blood and lymphatic vessels to investigate the relationship between hyperoxia and its negative health effects. Such models have been used to better understand vascular health in diseases, such as atherosclerosis, Gong said, and can be applied to studying and improving the health of astronauts.

The Indiana Space Grant Consortium was created in 1991 under NASA’s National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Space Grant national network includes organizations working to expand opportunities for Americans to learn about and participate in NASA’s aeronautics and space projects by supporting and enhancing science and engineering education, research and public outreach efforts.

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ANNOUNCEMENT!

NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) internship

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Learn More

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PLANT THE MOON CHALLENGE

Plant the Moon

YOUR MISSION

Your mission is about to begin. Whether you’re a pilot navigating food innovations on your own or a crew of seasoned zany space botanists, there’s a path for you to take to grow plants on the Moon - and now Mars, too!

The Plant the Moon Challenge is for anyone daring enough to explore and stretch the limits of human possibility & to be a part of the next frontier – the habitation of the Moon and Mars. Young or old, K-12 or university student, garden or space hobbyist, scientist or Star Wars fanatic - humanity’s future is in your hands. Earth’s space programs count on YOU to set up the human race and our astronauts with food security in space for exploration and habitation.

Accept your mission. Register today!

TSGC LiftOff and Liftoff Alumni Summer Institute 2023 application is LIVE!

Texas Space Grant Consortium is live with our program application for LiftOff and Liftoff Alumni Summer Institute 2023! Application deadline December 20, 2022!

 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT

Beginning in the summer of 1990, the NASA's Texas Space Grant Consortium initiated a week-long professional development training for teachers. This aerospace workshop, called LiftOff, emphasizes science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning experiences by incorporating a space science theme supported by NASA missions. Teacher participants are provided with information and experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations that promote space science and enrichment activities for themselves and others.

 

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

From looking for potential asteroids or comets that might impact Earth, to protecting our home planet, NASA’s Planetary defense research is critical to our assessment of future impact hazards, for developing spacecraft missions that will assist us in protecting our home and increasing our understanding of the world around us. Join us for LiftOff 2023: Planetary Defenders, June 25-30, 2023.

 

PROGRAM FEATURES:

  • Presentations by NASA scientists and engineers
  • Tours of NASA and Space Center Houston
  • Hands-on, inquiry-based classroom activities aligned to educational standards
  • Career Exploration
  • Teacher Feature (sharing of classroom lessons and activities)
  • Opportunity to interact with researchers dedicated to space missions

 

The deadline for receiving applications is December 20, 2022, for LiftOff 2023 and should be submitted through the online system:  https://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/index.html

 

Thank you for your assistance.  Should you have questions or need additional information, please let me know.

 

CELENA MILLER | Project Manager

NASA | Texas Space Grant

The University of Texas at Austin | Center for Space Research

3925 W. Braker Lane, Suite 200

Austin, TX 78759

Phone:    512-232-6895

Email:     cmi...@csr.utexas.edu

ZED FACTOR FELLOWSHIP

What makes the Zed Factor Fellowship Unique?

  • Industry Leading Internships
  • Powerful Professional Development
  • Network and Community Building
  • Impactful Community Service
  • Meaningful Mentorship

Recent Accomplishments

  • 3500+ Students Directly Impacted
  • 180+ Applicants from 110+ Schools

To learn more about this awesome Fellowship opportunity. Please download the pdf below.

Texas Space Grant Consortium is live with our program application for LiftOff and Liftoff Alumni Summer Institute 2023! Application deadline December 20, 2022!

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT

Beginning in the summer of 1990, the NASA's Texas Space Grant Consortium initiated a week-long professional development training for teachers. This aerospace workshop, called LiftOff, emphasizes science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning experiences by incorporating a space science theme supported by NASA missions. Teacher participants are provided with information and experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations that promote space science and enrichment activities for themselves and others.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

From looking for potential asteroids or comets that might impact Earth, to protecting our home planet, NASA’s Planetary defense research is critical to our assessment of future impact hazards, for developing spacecraft missions that will assist us in protecting our home and increasing our understanding of the world around us. Join us for LiftOff 2023: Planetary Defenders, June 25-30, 2023.

PROGRAM FEATURES:

  • Presentations by NASA scientists and engineers
  • Tours of NASA and Space Center Houston
  • Hands-on, inquiry-based classroom activities aligned to educational standards
  • Career Exploration
  • Teacher Feature (sharing of classroom lessons and activities)
  • Opportunity to interact with researchers dedicated to space missions

 

The deadline for receiving applications is December 20, 2022, for LiftOff 2023 and should be submitted through the online system: https://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/index.html

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Grant funding Trine research to help make space travel safer

Grant

As efforts intensify to increase the number of manned missions into space, Trine University undergraduate students will once again conduct research to help make such missions safer.

The Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC) has awarded nearly $15,000 to the university to fund an undergraduate research project that will design a model to investigate the impact of the harsh environment of space on lymphatic vessels in the immune system.

Using a similar grant last year, Trine students engineered models that mimic blood tissue to assess the impact on those tissues of the increased oxygen required prior to a spacewalk.

Max Gong, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Bock Department of Biomedical Engineering, will oversee a research team of eight students representing multiple engineering disciplines.

Team members are: Amy Apgar, a biomedical engineering major from Wickliffe, Ohio; Isabella Didonna, a biomedical engineering major from Knox, Indiana; CJ Elston, a chemical engineering major from Plainfield, Indiana; Destany Garcia Ortiz, a design engineering technology major from Indianapolis; Upasana Shrestha, a biomedical engineering major from Nepal; Lilly Speier, a biomedical engineering major from Hartland, Michigan; Aaron Streit, a biomedical engineering major from New Paris, Indiana; and Aiden Theobald, a biomedical engineering major from Waveland, Missouri.

Where no one has gone before

Gong said studies have been conducted investigating the effects of oxidative stress caused by space environmental factors — the imbalance between reactive chemicals formed from oxygen and the body’s ability to cope with them that occurs when oxygen is increased or decreased — on organ systems and immune cells. However, there is minimal research into its impacts on structural components of the immune system such as lymphatic vessels.

“To advance our understanding in this area, engineering students at Trine University propose to develop models to investigate the effect of induced oxidative stress on the lymphatic system, and consequently, on the immune system,” he said.

The team’s goal will be to develop models of lymphatic vessels that better represent actual human vessels. The group will generate its models using human lymphatic endothelial cells (HLECs) acquired from commercial research distributors.

The team will expose models to low- and high-oxygen environments simulating changes in environmental pressure an astronaut may experience during spacewalks and gather data on cell viability and growth as well as secretion of cytokines, substances typically secreted by immune cells. The group also will record data for cultures that include its models along immune cells in the same environment.

Members will compile data to be shared at academic conferences and in research journals.

The Indiana Space Grant Consortium was created in 1991 under NASA’s National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Space Grant national network includes organizations working to expand opportunities for Americans to learn about and participate in NASA’s aeronautics and space projects by supporting and enhancing science and engineering education, research and public outreach efforts.

Photo: Max Gong, Ph.D., left, assistant professor in the Bock Department of Biomedical Engineering at Trine University, will oversee a team of eight students designing a model to investigate the impact of the harsh environment of space on lymphatic vessels in the immune system. From front to back are Amy Apgar, Destany Garcia Ortiz, Upasana Shrestha, CJ Elston, Isabella Didonna, Lilly Speier, Aaron Streit and Aiden Theobald. (Photo by Dean Orewiler)

NASA's 2023 Big Idea Challenge

The 2023 BIG Idea Challenge provides undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to design, develop, and demonstrate technologies that will enable the production of lunar infrastructure from ISRU-derived metals found on the Moon. Key infrastructure products desired are storage vessels for liquids and gases, extrusions, pipes, power cables, and supporting structures (i.e., roads, landing pads, etc.). Teams are invited to submit proposals that focus on any part of the metal product production pipeline* from prospecting to testing.

Eligibility 

The BIG Idea Challenge is open to teams of undergraduate and graduate students at accredited U.S.-based colleges and universities officially affiliated with their state’s Space Grant Consortium. Non-Space Grant affiliated colleges/universities may partner with a Space Grant affiliated academic institution who takes a primary role on the project (i.e., the Space-Grant affiliated university must submit the proposal on behalf of the joint team). Minority Serving Institutions are encouraged to apply.

Each team will submit a detailed and realistic budget in their proposals, not to exceed $180K. A wide range of award sizes is expected (in the range of $50K to $180K), depending on the scope of the work proposed. NASA anticipates funding several larger-scope awards ($125 - $180K) and several smaller-scope awards ($50K - $124K). Proposers are encouraged to request what is actually needed to conduct the proposed work, because value to NASA will be considered in the selections.

Deadlines

All deadlines must be met by 11:59 p.m. ET on the dates specified below, unless otherwise noted.

Late deliverables will not be accepted.

DATE Description

January 24, 2023                                                        Proposal and Video Deadline

March 2, 2023                                                             Teams are notified of their selection status

Mid-March, 2023                                                        1st installment of development stipends sent, as appropriate

June 7, 2023                                                                Deadline for Mid-Project Review (MPR) submission

June 27, 2023                                                              Teams are notified of Pass/Fail status

Early July, 2023                                                           2nd installment stipends are sent as appropriate from SG directly to schools

June - August, 2023                                                    Summer work

September – October 2023                                      Fall work (technology verification demonstrations)

October 2, 2023                                                          Deadline for Forum Registration and Payment

October 14, 2023                                                       Deadline for Forum Hotel Reservations

October 23, 2023                                                       Deadline to submit Technical Paper and Technology Verification Demo

November 12, 2023 4:00 PM Eastern Time           Deadline to submit Presentation Chart Deck and Digital Poster

November 15-17, 2023 2                                          023 BIG Idea Forum (Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH)

 

 

 

INSGC Photo Of The Day

November 28th, 2022

Explanation: Where will the next meteor appear? Even during a meteor shower, it is practically impossible to know. Therefore, a good way to enjoy a meteor shower is to find a place where you can sit comfortably and monitor a great expanse of dark sky. And it may be satisfying to share this experience with a friend. The meteor shower depicted was the 2022 Leonids which peaked earlier this month, and the view is from Hainan, China looking out over the South China Sea. Meteor streaks captured over a few hours were isolated and added to a foreground image recorded earlier. From this place and time, Leonid meteors that trace back to the constellation of Leo were seen streaking across other constellations including Orion. The bright red planet Mars appears near the top of the image. Bonding over their love of astronomy, the two pictured meteor enthusiasts, shown celebrating their common birthday this month, are now married.

Nov 28th

Funding

Funding source for INSGC Fellowships, Internships; Research and Outreach Project funding for Higher Education, K-12, and Informal Education through INSGC affiliates.

Academic

Research funding available for undergraduates, graduates and faculty.

Industry

Collaboration opportunities with industries for internships and skill set training.

Outreach

Funding for projects that create public awareness of INSGC and NASA.

Need Funding?

Browse through the opportunities we offer and apply today!

K-12

Indiana Space Grant Consortium supports K-12 education by offering space based resources to excite children about STEM and NASA education. You can find these resources below.

Educational Resources

Teacher Resources

Educational Programs

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Higher Education

INSGC higher education affiliates throughout Indiana with eligible students, must be a US citizen, enrolled full-time as a collegiate student, be involved in STEM related research or STEM education project, are eligible to apply for scholarship/fellowship.

Undergraduate

Beginning in 2020, INSGC no longer offers UG Scholarships. Instead INSGC offers Undergraduate Research Internships.

Students will not directly apply for this funding from INSGC. Faculty members (PI) who are supervising a research activity will apply for the award for the number of students planning to participate in the project. UG students will be paid an hourly rate for research.

 

Graduate

Fellowships, Masters/Ph.D are available for graduate students pursuing research projects with any INSGC affiliate. New for 2020, applicants must specify a NASA Center and/or a Mission Directorate alignment.

Faculty

Research awarded to be conducted by faculty who submit project proposals that help NASA achieve national research objectives

New for 2020. All proposals must specify a NASA Center and/or Mission Directorate with which it is aligned.

Informal Education

Information, resources, and funding for Professional Development for informal educators relating to science, technology, engineering, and math.

Outreach

INSGC outreach affiliates may apply for grant funding that engages K-12 students in STEM curriculum and hands-on learning.

New for 2020. All proposals must specify a NASA Center and/or Mission Directorate with which it is aligned.

View our Academic pages for more information.

Looking For Career Opportunities?

INSGC currently has a career page with information 

and a few valuable resources!

The INSGC twitter page is linked above. There will also be a link to our INSGC Facebook page shortly.

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